Differenze tra le versioni di "John e Roy Boulting"

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Nel [[1941]] Roy si unisce alla [[Army Film Unit]], per la quale realizza gli importanti documentari bellici ''[[Desert Victory]]'' ([[1943]]) e ''[[Burma Victory]]'' ([[1945]]). John si unisce invece alla [[RAF Film Unit]], per cui realizza ''[[Journey Together]]'' (1945), con protagonista il quasi esordiente [[Richard Attenborough]].
 
Negli anni fra il [[1947]] e il [[1951]] i fratelli Boulting raggiungono gli esiti più alti della loro carriera, realizzando film di forte impegno sociale. Roy dirige ''[[Fame Is the Spur]]'' (1947), sulla perdita di ideali di un politico [[Partito Laburista (Regno Unito)|laburista]] e ''[[The Guinea Pig]]'' ([[1948]]), sui pregiudizi di classe nella scuola inglese. John dirige un adattamento da [[Graham Greene (scrittore)|Graham Greene]], ''[[Brighton Rock (film)|Brighton Rock]]'' (1948), di grande successo e destinato a diventare un classico della storia del cinema britannico.
 
I successivi ''[[Minaccia atomica]]'' (''Seven Days to Noon'') ([[1950]]), girato in coppia, e ''[[S.O.S. Scotland Yard]]'' (''High Treason'') ([[1951]]), girato da Roy, sono dei thriller, ma con una preminente connotazione d'attualità e con un taglio semi-documentaristico: il primo affronta il tema degli armamenti nucleari, il secondo quello del terrorismo interno.
 
Nella prima metà degli [[Anni 1950|anni cinquanta]]
 
 
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After the war, Roy's Fame Is the Spur (1947), an intelligent study of a Labour politician who loses his ideals, was coolly received in Labour-run Britain, though it is both unsentimental and very touching. John's compelling adaptation of Graham Greene's Brighton Rock (1948), with its evocation of a tawdry and violent world, was a box-office success and has proved to be an enduring classic. Roy persevered with the mission for a topical, socially relevant, cinema with The Guinea Pig (1948), in which a lower class boy wins a scholarship to an English Public School and has to face entrenched snobbery and class prejudice. It was followed by two films which work effectively as thrillers but are very much rooted in contemporary actuality. Seven Days to Noon (1950) deals with the threat of what would now be called nuclear terrorism; while High Treason (1951) concentrates on subversion and sabotage in the London docks. This period, between 1947 and 1951, represents the Boultings' major achievement, each of the films being trenchant, relevant and distinctive.
 
 
 
There was a lull in the mid-50s when they made several films for Hollywood companies with American stars. None of these is a disgrace; nor is any of them either as socially relevant or as artistically distinctive as their '40s work. Roy directed Single-Handed (1953), a mildly exciting remake of Brown on Resolution (d. Walter Forde, 1935), for Fox-British, and Run for the Sun (1956), a remake of The Most Dangerous Game, in Hollywood; and together they directed Seagulls over Sorrento (1954), a popular West End service comedy re-worked for an American cast, for MGM-British.
Apart from this popular series, several other films deserve mention. John directed the Festival of Britain, The Magic Box (1951), with a fabulous star cast, and achieved some poignancy in narrating the life of British film pioneer, William Friese-Greene; Roy directed Happy Is the Bride (1957), a sunny remake of Quiet Wedding (d. Anthony Asquith, 1941); the two co-directed and -produced Suspect (1960), an attempt at a 'B' film that merited respect for its treatment of politics and science, and the tenderly observed comedy-drama of marital difficulties, The Family Way (1966). This latter film, based on Bill Naughton's play, All in Good Time, tackles with sensitivity and warmth the problem of an unconsummated marriage and, even more affectingly, a long-established marriage which has shied clear of truthful understanding. Roy later married the film's star, Hayley Mills, their age gap raising considerable publicity. There was also a return to the morbid psychology of Brighton Rock in Twisted Nerve (1968), a film which was poorly received at the time but has subsequently attained cult status for its bizarre story (by Leo Marks) and the outstanding performances of Hywel Bennett and Hayley Mills.
 
The Boultings were an influential force behind the scenes in British cinema. Not only were they among the most successful production teams, they also contributed to its industrial muscle as directors of British Lion, an independent distribution company which offered producers an alternative to the Rank/ABPC duopoly. John died of cancer at Sunningdale on 17 June 1985. Roy died of cancer at Oxford on 5 November 2001, without having completed the memoirs he had been working on for some years.
 
They began with serious, tight, economical drama films such as Seven Days to Noon (1950) and Graham Greene's Brighton Rock (1947) (both with producer: Roy, director: John).<!-- They then became known for a series of satirical comedy films which are considered British classics today, such as Private's Progress (1956), Lucky Jim (1957) and I'm All Right Jack (1959), all with the same credits as above, and usually with John as co-writer. The comedies often starred Ian Carmichael as the lead, along with Richard Attenborough and Terry-Thomas; and often Dennis Price, John Le Mesurier, Irene Handl and Miles Malleson.
 
 
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They began with serious, tight, economical drama films such as Seven Days to Noon (1950) and Graham Greene's Brighton Rock (1947) (both with producer: Roy, director: John). They then became known for a series of satirical comedy films which are considered British classics today, such as Private's Progress (1956), Lucky Jim (1957) and I'm All Right Jack (1959), all with the same credits as above, and usually with John as co-writer. The comedies often starred Ian Carmichael as the lead, along with Richard Attenborough and Terry-Thomas; and often Dennis Price, John Le Mesurier, Irene Handl and Miles Malleson.
 
I'm All Right Jack also starred Peter Sellers and boosted his film career, winning him a BAFTA Best Actor Award. He also appeared in other Boulting brothers films later. The Family Way (1966) was a slightly controversial film about a young married couple and their down-to-earth family.
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Roy Boulting did some work in British TV in the eighties including directing one of the popular BBC Miss Marple mysteries. In 1971, he married Hayley Mills whom he met on the set of The Family Way, and they had a son, Crispian Mills. They divorced in 1977.
 
John died on June 17, 1985, in Sunningdale, Berkshire and Roy on November 5, 2001.
 
Their elder brother Sydney Boulting, became an actor and stage producer as Peter Cotes, he was the original director of The Mousetrap -->
 
== Filmografia ==
 
===Regia di John Boulting===
 
 
# Rotten to the Core (1965)
... alias Rotten to the Corps (UK)
... alias 8 facce di bronzo (Italy) [it]
 
 
 
*''[[Journey Together]]'' ([[1945]])
*''[[Brighton Rock (film)|Brighton Rock]]'' ([[1947]])
*''[[Lucky Jim]]'' (''Lucky Jim'') ([[1957]])
*''[[Nudi alla meta]]'' (''I'm All Right Jack'') ([[1959]])
#*''[[8 facce di bronzo]]'' (''Rotten to the Core'') ([[1965]])
 
 
 
===Regia di Roy Boulting===