Utente:Panz Panz/Sandbox/4

Le competizioni d'arte facevano parte dei Giochi della V Olimpiade, questa è stata la prima olimpiade in cui apparsa questa disciplina. Le competizioni erano divise in cinque categorie (architettura, letteratura, musica, pittura e scultura) per lavori ispirati a tematiche sportive. Ad un meeting del Comitato Olimpico Internazionale avvenuto nel 1949 si decise di abolire le competizioni di natura artistica, dal 1952 viene disputato un festival artistico che non rientra nelle discipline ufficiali.

Medal summaryModifica

Architecture none awarded   Holger Sinding-Larsen (NOR)
Project for a gymnastics school
none awarded
Literature   Raniero Nicolai (ITA)
"Canzoni Olimpioniche"
  Theodore Andrea Cook (GBR)
"Olympic Games of Antwerp"
  Maurice Bladel (BEL)
"La Louange des Dieux"
Music   Georges Monier (BEL)
"Olympique"
  Oreste Riva (ITA)
"Marcia trionfale"
none awarded
Painting none awarded   Henriette Brossin de Polanska (FRA)
"L'élan"
  Alfred Ost (BEL)
"Joueur de Football"
Sculpture   Albéric Collin (BEL)
"La Force"
  Simon Goossens (BEL)
"Les Patineurs"
  Alphons De Cuyper (BEL)
"Lanceur de Poids" and "Coureur"

Medal tableModifica

At the time, medals were awarded to these artists, but art competitions are no longer regarded as official Olympic events by the International Olympic Committee. These events do not appear in the IOC medal database,[1] and these totals are not included in the IOC's medal table for the 1920 Games.[2]

Posiz. Nazione Oro Argento Bronzo Totale
1 Template:Flagteam 2 1 3 6
2 Template:Flagteam 1 1 0 2
3 Template:Flagteam 0 1 0 1
Template:Flagteam 0 1 0 1
Template:Flagteam 0 1 0 1
Total 3 5 3 11

ReferencesModifica

Template:EventsAt1920SummerOlympics Template:Olympic Games Art Competitions


Art competitions were held as part of the 1924 Summer Olympics in Paris, France. Medals were awarded in five categories (architecture, literature, music, painting, and sculpture), for works inspired by sport-related themes.

Art competitions at the Olympic Games were part of the Olympic program from 1912 to 1948, but were discontinued due to concerns about amateurism and professionalism. Since 1952, a non-competitive art and cultural festival has been associated with each Games.

Medal summaryModifica

Architecture none awarded   Alfréd Hajós and Dezső Lauber (HUN)
Plan for a stadium
  Julien Médecin (MON)
Stadium for Monte Carlo
Literature   Géo-Charles (FRA)
"Jeux Olympiques"
  Josef Petersen (DEN)
"Euryale"
  Charles Gonnet (FRA)
"Vers le Dieu d'Olympie"
  Margaret Stuart (UK)
"Sword Songs"
  Oliver Gogarty (IRL)
"Ode to the Tailteann Games"
Music none awarded none awarded none awarded
Painting   Jean Jacoby (LUX)
"Corner", "Départ", and "Rugby"
  Jack Butler Yeats (IRL)
"Swimming"
  Johan van Hell (NED)
"Patineurs"
Sculpture   Konstantinos Dimitriadis (GRE)
"Discobole Finlandais"
  Frantz Heldenstein (LUX)
"Vers l'olympiade"
  Jean René Gauguin (DEN)
Boxer
  Claude-Léon Mascaux (FRA)
Sports medals

Medal tableModifica

At the time, medals were awarded to these artists, but art competitions are no longer regarded as official Olympic events by the International Olympic Committee. These events do not appear in the IOC medal database,[3] and these totals are not included in the IOC's medal table for the 1924 Games.[4]

Posiz. Nazione Oro Argento Bronzo Totale
1 Template:Flagteam 1 1 0 2
2 Template:Flagteam 1 0 2 3
3 Template:Flagteam 1 0 0 1
4 Template:Flagteam 0 1 1 2
Template:Flagteam 0 1 1 2
6 Template:Flagteam 0 1 0 1
Template:Flagteam 0 1 0 1
8 Template:Flagteam 0 0 1 1
Template:Flagteam 0 0 1 1

ReferencesModifica

Template:EventsAt1924SummerOlympics Template:Olympic Games Art Competitions


 
Jan Wils won the gold medal for the design of the Olympic Stadium in Amsterdam
 
"Rugby" by Jean Jacoby

Art competitions were held as part of the 1928 Summer Olympics in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Medals were awarded in five categories (architecture, literature, music, painting, and sculpture), for works inspired by sport-related themes.

The art exhibition was held at the Stedelijk Museum from 12 June to 12 August, and displayed 1150 works of art from 18 different countries. Additionally, the literature competition attracted 40 entries from 10 countries, and the music competition had 22 entries from 9 countries.[1]

The art competitions at the 1928 Games was larger in scope than for previous Games. Instead of a single competition in each of the five artistic categories, awards were presented in multiple subcategories.[2] The judges of the music competition declined to award any medals in two of the three subcategories, and only presented a single bronze medal in the third.

Art competitions were part of the Olympic program from 1912 to 1948.[3] At a meeting of the International Olympic Committee in 1949, it was decided to hold art exhibitions instead, as it was judged illogical to permit professionals to compete in the art competitions but only amateurs were permitted to compete in sporting events.[4] Since 1952, a non-competitive art and cultural festival has been associated with each Games.

ArchitectureModifica

Architectural design   Jan Wils (NED)
Olympic Stadium at Amsterdam[2]
  Ejnar Mindedal Rasmussen (DEN)
Swimming pool at Ollerup
  Jacques Lambert (FRA)
Stadium at Versailles
Town planning   Adolf Hensel (GER)
Stadium at Nuremberg
  Jacques Lambert (FRA)
Stadium at Versailles
  Max Laeuger (GER)
Municipal Park at Hamburg

LiteratureModifica

Lyric works   Kazimierz Wierzyński (POL)
"Laur Olimpijski"
  Rudolf G. Binding (GER)
"Reitvorschrift für eine Geliebte"
  Johannes Weltzer (DEN)
"Symphonia Heroica"
Dramatic works none awarded   Lauro De Bosis (ITA)
"Icarus"
none awarded
Epic works   Ferenc Mező (HUN)
"L'histoire des Jeux Olympiques"
  Ernst Weiß (GER)
"Boetius von Orlamünde"
  Carel Scharten &
Margo Scharten-Antink (NED)
"De Nar uit de Maremmen"

MusicModifica

Song none awarded none awarded none awarded
One instrument none awarded none awarded none awarded
Orchestra none awarded none awarded   Rudolph Simonsen (DEN)
"Symphony No. 2 Hellas"

PaintingModifica

Paintings   Isaac Israëls (NED)
"Cavalier Rouge"
  Laura Knight (UK)
"Boxeurs"
  Walther Klemm (GER)
"Patinage"
Drawings   Jean Jacoby (LUX)
"Rugby"
  Alexandre Virot (FRA)
"Gestes de Football"
  Władysław Skoczylas (POL)
Posters
Graphic works   William Nicholson (GBR)
"Un Almanach de douze Sports"
  Carl Moos (SUI)
Posters
  Max Feldbauer (GER)
"Mailcoach"

SculptureModifica

Statues   Paul Landowski (FRA)
"Boxeur"
  Milo Martin (SUI)
"Athlète au repos"
  Renée Sintenis (GER)
"Footballeur"
Reliefs and medallions   Edwin Grienauer (AUT)
Médailles
  Chris van der Hoef (NED)
Médaille pour les Jeux Olympiques
  Edwin Scharff (GER)
Plaquette

Medal tableModifica

At the time, medals were awarded to these artists, but art competitions are no longer regarded as official Olympic events by the International Olympic Committee. These events do not appear in the IOC medal database,[5] and these totals are not included in the IOC's medal table for the 1928 Games.[6]

Posiz. Nazione Oro Argento Bronzo Totale
1 Template:Flagteam 2 1 1 4
2 Template:Flagteam 1 2 5 8
3 Template:Flagteam 1 2 1 4
4 Template:Flagteam 1 1 0 2
5 Template:Flagteam 1 0 1 2
6 Template:Flagteam 1 0 0 1
Template:Flagteam 1 0 0 1
Template:Flagteam 1 0 0 1
9 Template:Flagteam 0 2 0 2
10 Template:Flagteam 0 1 2 3
11 Template:Flagteam 0 1 0 1

ReferencesModifica

  1. ^ G. van Rossem (ed.), The Ninth Olympiad. Amsterdam 1928. Official Report (PDF), Amsterdam, J. H. de Bussy, 1928, pp. 877–901. URL consultato il 25 marzo 2008.
  2. ^ a b Wagner, Juergen, Olympic Art Competition 1928 Amsterdam, in Olympic Games Museum. URL consultato il 25 marzo 2008.
  3. ^ Bernhard Kramer, In Search of the Lost Champions of the Olympic Art Contests (PDF), in Journal of Olympic History, vol. 12, n. 2, May 2004, pp. pp. 29–34. URL consultato il 25 marzo 2008.
  4. ^ A. Bolanaki, Report on Art Exhibitions (PDF), in Bulletin du Comité International Olympique, n. 27, International Olympic Committee, June 1951, pp. p. 34. URL consultato il 26 marzo 2008.
  5. ^ Olympic Medal Winners, su olympic.org, International Olympic Committee. URL consultato il 26 marzo 2008.
  6. ^ Amsterdam 1928 Medal Table, su olympic.org, International Olympic Committee. URL consultato il 26 marzo 2008.

Template:EventsAt1928SummerOlympics Template:Olympic Games Art Competitions


 
Richard Konwiarz won the bronze medal for the design of the Schlesierkampfbahn in Breslavia.

Art competitions were held as part of the 1932 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles, United States. Medals were awarded in five categories (architecture, literature, music, painting, and sculpture), for works inspired by sport-related themes.

Art competitions at the Olympic Games were part of the Olympic program from 1912 to 1948, but were discontinued due to concerns about amateurism and professionalism. Since 1952, a non-competitive art and cultural festival has been associated with each Games.

ArchitectureModifica

Architectural design   Gustave Saacké, Pierre Montenot, Pierre Bailly (FRA)
Design for a "Cirque pour Toros"
  John Russell Pope (USA)
Design for the Payne Whitney Gymnasium, New Haven, Conn.
  Richard Konwiarz (GER)
Design for a "Schlesierkampfbahn" in the Sport Park of Breslavia
Town planning   John Hughes (GBR)
Design for a Sports and Recreation Center with Stadium, for the City of Liverpool
  Jens Klemmensen (DEN)
Design for a Stadium and Public Park
  André Verbeke (BEL)
Design for a "Marathon Park"

LiteratureModifica

Literature   Paul Bauer (GER)
"Am Kangehenzonga"
  Josef Petersen (DEN)
"The Argonauts"
none awarded

MusicModifica

Music none awarded   Josef Suk (TCH)
"Into a New Life" symphonic march
none awarded

PaintingModifica

Paintings   David Wallin (SWE)
"At the Seaside of Arild"
  Ruth Miller (USA)
"Struggle"
none awarded
Watercolors and drawings   Lee Blair (USA)
"Rodeo"
  Percy Crosby (USA)
"Jackknife"
  Gerhard Westermann (NED)
"Horseman"
Prints   Joseph Golinkin (USA)
"Leg Scissors"
  Janina Konarska (POL)
"Narciarze" ("Skier")
  Joachim Karsch (GER)
"Stabwechsel"

SculptureModifica

Statues   Mahonri Young (USA)
"The Knockdown"
  Miltiades Manno (HUN)
"Wrestling"
  Jakub Obrovský (TCH)
"Odysseus"
Medals and reliefs   Józef Klukowski (POL)
"Sport Sculpture II"
  Frederick MacMonnies (USA)
"Lingbergh Medal"
  R. Tait McKenzie (CAN)
"Shield of the Athletes"

Medal tableModifica

At the time, medals were awarded to these artists, but art competitions are no longer regarded as official Olympic events by the International Olympic Committee. These events do not appear in the IOC medal database,[5] and these totals are not included in the IOC's medal table for the 1932 Games.[6]

Posiz. Nazione Oro Argento Bronzo Totale
1 Template:Flagteam 3 4 0 7
2 Template:Flagteam 1 1 0 2
3 Template:Flagteam 1 0 2 3
4 Template:Flagteam 1 0 0 1
Template:Flagteam 1 0 0 1
Template:Flagteam 1 0 0 1
7 Template:Flagteam 0 2 0 2
8 Template:Flagteam 0 1 1 2
9 Template:Flagteam 0 1 0 1
10 Template:Flagteam 0 0 1 1
Template:Flagteam 0 0 1 1
Template:Flagteam 0 0 1 1
Total 8 9 6 23

ReferencesModifica

Template:EventsAt1932SummerOlympics Template:Olympic Games Art Competitions


Art competitions were held as part of the 1936 Summer Olympics in Berlin, Germany. Medals were awarded in five categories (architecture, literature, music, painting, and sculpture), for works inspired by sport-related themes.

The art exhibition was held in a hall of the Berlin Exhibition from July 15 to August 16, and displayed 667 works of art from 22 different countries. Additionally, the literature competition attracted 40 entries from 12 countries, and the music competition had 33 entries from 9 countries.[1]

The art competitions at the 1936 Games were similar to the 1928 and 1932 Games, with medals being awarded in multiple subcategories for each of the five artistic categories.[2] The judges declined to award any medals for three subcategories, and no gold medals for another three subcategories.


Art competitions were part of the Olympic program from 1912 to 1948.[3] At a meeting of the International Olympic Committee in 1949, it was decided to hold art exhibitions instead, as it was judged illogical to permit professionals to compete in the art competitions but only amateurs were permitted to compete in sporting events.[4] Since 1952, a non-competitive art and cultural festival has been associated with each Games.

ArchitetturaModifica

Categoria Oro   Argento   Bronzo  
Progetti di impianti Hermann Kutschera
(  Austria)
Stadio dello sci
Werner March e Walter March
(  Germania)
Campo sportivo del Reich
Hermann Stiegholzer e Herbert Kastinger
(  Austria)
Impianti per a lotta a Vienna
Progetti urbanistici Werner March e Walter March
(  Germania)
Campo sportivo del Reich
Charles Downing Lay
(  Stati Uniti)
Parco marino di Brooklyn
Theo Nussbaum
(  Germania)
Parco cittadino e degli impianti sportivi di Colonia

LiteratureModifica

Categoria Oro   Argento   Bronzo  
Poesie Felix Dhünen
(  Germania)
Il corridore
Bruno Fattori
(  Italia)
Profili azzurri
Hans Stoiber
(  Austria)
Il disco
Drammaturgia non assegnato non assegnato non assegnato
Epica Urho Karhumäki
(  Finlandia)
In acque libere
Wilhelm Ehmer
(  Germania)
Sulla cima del mondo
Jan Parandowski
(  Polonia)
Disco olimpionico

MusicaModifica

 
Francobollo dedicato a Werner Egk, vincitore dell'oro.
Categoria Oro   Argento   Bronzo  
Solista e coro Paul Höffer
(  Germania)
Giuramento olimpico
Kurt Thomas
(  Germania)
Canto sull'Olimpiade 1936
Harald Genzmer
(  Germania)
Il corridore
Strumentale non assegnato non assegnato non assegnato
Orchestra Werner Egk
(  Germania)
Musica da festa olimpionica
Lino Liviabella
  Italia
Il vincitore
Jaroslav Křička
(  Cecoslovacchia)
La scalata

PitturaModifica

Categoria Oro   Argento   Bronzo  
Pittura non assegnato Rudolf Eisenmenger
(  Austria)
Corridore prima del traguardo
Ryuji Fujita
(  Giappone)
Hockey su ghiaccio
Disegno e acquerelli non assegnato Romano Dazzi
(  Italia)
Quattro cartoni
Sujaku Suzuki
(  Giappone)
Corsa tipica giapponese di cavalli
Grafica non assegnato non assegnato non assegnato
Grafica applicata Alex Diggelmann
(  Svizzera)
Arosa I
Alfred Hierl
(  Germania)
Progetto della pista di Avus
Stanisław Ostoja-Chrostowski
(  Polonia)
Diploma dello Yacht Club

SculptureModifica

 
A sinistra vi è l'opera di Farpi Vignoli che ha vinto l'oro, ovvero .
Categoria Oro   Argento   Bronzo  
statue Farpi Vignoli
(  Italia)
Arno Breker
(  Germania)
Stig Blomberg
(  Svezia)
Asertty Emil Sutor
(  Germania)
Józef Klukowski
(  Polonia)
non assegnato
medaglie non assegnato Luciano Mercante
(  Italia)
Josue Dupon
(  Belgio)


Medal tableModifica

At the time, medals were awarded to these artists, but art competitions are no longer regarded as official Olympic events by the International Olympic Committee. These events do not appear in the IOC medal database,[5] and these totals are not included in the IOC's medal table for the 1936 Games.[6]

Posiz. Nazione Oro Argento Bronzo Totale
1   Germania 5 5 2 12
2   Italia 1 4 0 5
3   Austria 1 1 2 4
4   Finlandia 1 0 0 1
  Svizzera 1 0 0 1
6   Polonia 0 1 2 3
7   Stati Uniti d'America 0 1 0 1
8   Giappone 0 0 2 2
9   Belgio 0 0 1 1
  Cecoslovacchia 0 0 1 1
  Svezia 0 0 1 1
Total 9 12 11 32

ReferencesModifica

  1. ^ Carl Diem, XIth Olympic Games, Berlin 1936 Official Report (PDF), Berlin, Wilhelm Limpert, 1937, pp. 1106–1123. URL consultato il 25 marzo 2008.
  2. ^ Wagner, Juergen, Olympic Art Competition 1936 Berlin, in Olympic Games Museum. URL consultato il 26 marzo 2008.
  3. ^ Bernhard Kramer, In Search of the Lost Champions of the Olympic Art Contests (PDF), in Journal of Olympic History, vol. 12, n. 2, May 2004, pp. pp. 29–34. URL consultato il 25 marzo 2008.
  4. ^ A. Bolanaki, Report on Art Exhibitions (PDF), in Bulletin du Comité International Olympique, n. 27, International Olympic Committee, June 1951, pp. p. 34. URL consultato il 26 marzo 2008.
  5. ^ Olympic Medal Winners, su olympic.org, International Olympic Committee. URL consultato il 26 marzo 2008.
  6. ^ Berlin 1936 Medal Table, su olympic.org, International Olympic Committee. URL consultato il 26 marzo 2008.